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Tag: By-Laws

NewsNow: Resident Threatened With Charge Under Elections Act For Sign

According to an article in the latest NewsNow, one resident was threatened with charges under the Elections Act for displaying a sign that was classified as an “election sign”.

The sign in question says “Who Speaks For The People of Ward 3?”

The Town’s “Sign By-law” 97-45 (link here) is the current in-force By-law regarding signs and it defines an election sign as follows:

There certainly is no municipal, regional, provincial or federal election underway nor does the sign appear to support a candidate or political party. What the sign appears to support is the exercise of Section 2(b) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms or simply “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression”.

It is not an absolute right, as Section 1 of the Charter can curtail rights with “such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society” on the freedom of expression. For instance, the pre-COVID adage of “you can’t yell fire in a crowded theatre” serves as an example.

In this case however, should the resident decide to pursue a Charter case, Town administration and their legal team would be hard-pressed to prove that the sign By-law can revoke that enshrined right. Section 1 of the Charter sets a very high bar.

Interestingly enough, one of the Town’s legal team, Mr. John Mascarin, co-penned a legal brief in 2002 entitled “Is The Writing On The Wall For Sign By-Laws In Canada?”. In that paper, the authors reviewed a then-recent Supreme Court of Canada decision on signs and how Charter rights and municipal sign By-laws interact.

“Given that the sole purpose of municipal regulation is to place limits on the means of expression, applicants have had little difficulty meeting their onus of showing that there has been a prima facie infringement of their rights.

The difficulty from a municipal lawyer’s perspective is that, once the
onus has transferred, justifying limitations in a sign by-law is extremely difficult under the rigorous s. 1 test.”

You can read the entire paper at this link here.

The current sign By-law dates back to 1997 and since that time there have been significant decisions that affect the enforceability and application of this type of By-law. Perhaps it is time for Council to look into this specific matter and bring this document into conformity with legal practice and judicial standards.

You can read the full NewsNow article at the following link:
https://www.wn3.ca/2021/02/03/resident-threatened-with-charge-under-elections-act-for-sign/

Notice: Council Meeting – September 17, 2018

With the last week of summer upon us, Council is back in session at it’s regular time on Monday night (September 17th @ 7PM).  Concerning the agenda, if you enjoy having a garage party after 11PM or dusting it up with a little street fight now and then…. the By-Law updates are for you.  For the rest of us, the Biodigester delegation may prove to be the more interesting item.

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Notes: Town Council – May 15, 2017

Agenda: https://grimsby.civicweb.net/filepro/documents…


Public Works Minutes Discussion

Mr. LeRoux presented a few details of the $8M ($5M with “other projects”) Winston Road reconstruction. Costs will be covered through Development Charges (92%), outside contributions ($1.3M) and $600K from the Town. Since DC’s won’t all be received at the time construction starts this June, short term borrowing will need to be put in place with interest payments charged back to DC’s. Potential of 5-8 years to recoup the costs in a “hot” market, and up to 20 years if things slow down (highly probable). Apparently Public Works does not expect too many “extras” and has set aside a small contingency ($100K) for possible overruns.

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Notes: Town Council – February 21, 2017

 


Budget

It’s budget time and draft “asks” are being circulated by the various committees. Read the posted committee agendas and find out where your tax dollars are proposed to be spent. Better yet, come to the Committee meetings (they’re open to the public) and hear the discussion – – a lot more is said than gets printed in the minutes.

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